Friday, January 29, 2016

Jackaby by William Ritter, 299 pages


I was really surprised by how much I enjoyed this.
A lot of people have said it's a combination of Sherlock Holmes and Doctor Who, and I entirely agree: specifically Cumberbatch and Ten, the best of each. He is oblivious to social cues and has a sharp intelligence, but is tempered by a genuine enthusiasm and compassion that keeps him from being a hateful jerk. And it's just a fun adventure besides.

The Jewel by Amy Ewing, 248 pages

Fantastic Read! The Bachelor meets The Hunger Games meets The Handmaid's Tale.

A Body to Spare by Sue Ann Jaffarian, 312 pages

Odelia Grey has discovered yet another body. To clear her name, Odelia and her family must start investigating not only who placed the body in her car trunk, but who killed the young man. As always, it's a race to solve the crime before she finds herself dead as well.
These are always funny and fast-paced reads. I'll keep reading as long as the author keeps writing.

Thursday, January 28, 2016

Wednesday, January 27, 2016

The Dead Duke , His Secret Wife, and the Missing Corpse by Piu Marie Eatwell, 338 pages

In 1898, the case that filled newspaper front pages and fascinated people across the English world, was the case of the Druce family. Some family members claimed that patriarch T.C. Druce had actually been the 5th Duke of Portland who ended his second life by faking the death of T.C. Druce. Millions of dollars and a title were at stake in this high-stakes case that took years to work its way through the courts and still left many questions unanswered.
This was an interesting case and kept me reading.

Monday, January 25, 2016

Little Robot by Ben Hatke, 144 pages


Simply adorable. The artwork is wonderful, and the storytelling is great.

Hood by Stephen Lawhead, 479 pages


While I definitely enjoyed some aspects of this Welsh retelling of Robin Hood, I wasn't particularly impressed with it overall by the end - until I read the author's note at the very end of the book.
I'm more impressed with it now, but wish I had been able to enjoy it more.

Saturday, January 23, 2016

The Hound of Death by Agatha Christie, essentially 344 pages


A particularly spooky set of short stories, revolving around haunted houses, supernatural murders and seances. My favorite thing about this was Christopher Lee's excellent narration.

Elantris by Brandon Sanderson, essentially 638 pages


Absolutely fantastic. Takes a little while to really get into it, but I truly enjoyed how carefully this story was constructed. Intense and beautiful.

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Torso by Brian Michael Bendis and Marc Andreyko, 280 pages

The pick for this month's Comics and Cocktails book club. Based on a series of murders in Cleveland in the 1930s. The artwork was very hard to read and follow. Not my favorite one so far.

The Elfstones of Shannara by Terry Brooks, 564 pages

The second in an truly outstanding fantasy series. MTV has turned this book into a tv show, The Shannara Chronicles.

Beastly Bones by William Ritter by 295 pages

I finished Jackaby and waited about 5 hours before starting the sequel. Just as fabulous as the first but now I have to wait until August for the third one.

The Life and Amours of the Beautiful, Gay & Dashing Kate Percival by "Kate Percival", 98 pages

Using Project Guttenberg, I've put a lot of old and obscure stuff on my e-reader for when I'm out and by some fluke, don't have a book to read. I picked this based on the title, just turned out to be a bad early edition of Fifty Shades without the bondage. I'm almost too ashamed to list it.

Monday, January 18, 2016

Sunny Side Up by Jennifer L. Holm and Matthew Holm, 224 pages


I always appreciate comic memoirs, even semi-memoirs.
I also really enjoyed the focus on validating childhood emotions.
Reminded me of Inside Out, in that regard.

The Secret Chord by Geraldine Brooks, 525 pages

This has sat on my to-read list for months and I finally made myself pick it up. A truly outstanding look at the King David's life. I love historical Christian fiction, but only if it's well-done and not untrue to Biblical belief while not being preachy. The author did an amazing job of bringing this truly flawed but magnificent man. He is the perfect example of how God truly uses the imperfect for his perfect plan.

Jackaby by William Ritter, 299 pages

A co-worker kept raving about how awesome this book was and kept trying to get me to read it. I put it on my hold list but pushed it off, I think mainly to be contrary. I finally got around to reading this and my regret is that I waited so long to pick it up.
Abigail Rook arrives in New England in 1892, and starts looking for work. She almost immediately stumbles across a job as an assistant to R.F. Jackaby. A detective with a supernatural bent, Jackaby has the ability to see what others can't. But Abigail's flair for seeing the ordinary serves Jackaby well. When a serial killer baffles the police it's up to this unlikely duo to solve the case, if the banshee's wail doesn't bode the end for them.
This is very much Sherlock meets the Brothers Grimm. An outstanding read!

Friday, January 15, 2016

Ms. Marvel, Vol. 3: Crushed by G. Willow Wilson, 112 pages


Eh, I'm still enjoying the uniqueness of Kamala Khan, but I'm really not as impressed with the art style in this one, and the stories are not all that compelling, but I don't know what more I expected.

Thursday, January 14, 2016

Fables, Volume 22, Farewell, 160 pages

I picked the wrong week to read this, first David Bowie, then Alan Rickman and finally saying goodbye to Fables. I just want to sit under my desk and cry.

Robots Versus Slime Monsters by A. Lee Martinez, 202 pages

I haven't read any of Martinez's other works but I might have to pick them up. This was a great collection of oddball fantasy/sci-fi short stories.

Almost Interesting by David Spade, 226 pages

I'm a sucker for biographies of actors I like, and David Spade falls into that category. It was interesting to see behind the curtain so to speak. The book wasn't nearly as snarky as I thought it would be but was still a good read.

Monday, January 11, 2016

The Siege Winter by Ariana Franklin & Samantha Norman, 338 pages

A very engrossing piece of historical fiction, set in the winter of 1141 in England when Matilda and Stephen destroyed the land fighting for the throne. This had an evil monk with a penchant for redheads, a castle under siege and a mercenary determined to protect the young girl in his care. Outstanding book.

Saturday, January 9, 2016

Motive by Jonathan Kellerman, 336 pages

There are over 2 dozen Alex Delaware books, but I have to say the series has stayed very enjoyable and attention-grabbing to this day.

Wednesday, January 6, 2016

Timmy Failure, Sanitized For Your Protection by Stpehan Pastis, 278 pages

This is one of the funniest children's series I've read. Timmy Failure is such an oddball character, the author does a great job of combining stupid humor with touching sweetness.

Bones Never Lie by Kathy Reichs, 326 pages

I think I've almost read too many of these to keep track of old plot details. It makes it really hard to enjoy the new ones.

Tuesday, January 5, 2016

Saga, Volume Five by Fiona Staples and Brian Vaughan, 152 pages

This graphic novel series is ripping the heart out of me. Can't we have at least one happy part in the book. Dang it, now I've got to wait months before the next one comes out.

Ornaments of Death by Jane K. Cleland, 291 pages

I've been reading the Josie Prescott Antiques mysteries from the very beginning. I've really enjoyed them over the years, but I haven't found myself loving the last few for some reason. With this book, I finally figured it out. The fact that Josie seems to have a perfect life, i.e., parents who adored her, the perfect man who loves her, an amazing business, and friends who dote on her, make her books almost a slap in the face for those of us who don't have such an amazing life. I'll keep reading the mysteries but not with such an eager attitude.

Monday, January 4, 2016

The City of Ember by Jeanne DuPrau, 270 pages


This is a close favorite of mine, which I always love returning to.

The Family Circus' Colorful Life by Bill Keane, 128 pages

A collection of the comics in color.

Garfield Throws His Weight Around by Jim Davis, 128 pages

The last Garfield collection I read before giving them all to Renee.

Reads Well With Others by Gene Ambaum & Bill Barnes, 120 pages

The newest Unshelved collection. They are spot on about the joys and dangers of working in a library.

The Ghost and Lady Alice by Marion Chesney, 222 pages

A co-worker checked out this book and it reminded me of how much I enjoy Marion Chesney's regency romances, so I checked it out as well. The Eighth Duke of Haversham is called back to help Alice, a cruelly treated servant to the Tenth Duke. The ghostly Duke comes up with a plan to launch Alice into society, but a growing love between the two could ring a death knell to his plans.
The Regency romances by Chesney are always fun, sweet and an enjoyable read. I think I'll have to go back and pick up some of my old favorites again.

Saturday, January 2, 2016

Shadows of Self by Brandon Sanderson, 383 pages


Absolutely brilliant. This is the latest in his Mistborn sister series, and I am STILL being taken by surprise.